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2 days ago

Shippen Manor

SHIPPEN MANOR VIRTUAL LAWN CONCERT: A HALO CALLED FRED

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions placed on large gatherings to stop the spread of the virus, the annual Shippen Manor Lawn Concerts Series could not be held in 2020. However, the Warren County Cultural and Heritage Division of the Department of Land Preservation, a partner of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, invites you to enjoy online concerts by the bands that were scheduled to perform. First up: A Halo Called Fred.

A Halo Called Fred has spent the last two decades making the geekiest sounds ever to spring from guitar, bass, violin, and Tupperware. Featuring songs about pirates, cavemen, and any body part or flying thing you can think of, they have lent their talents to Burlesque shows, motion picture soundtracks, a rock opera, and the annual charity event they host, “The Freaky Mutant Weirdo Variety Show.” Specializing in counter-cultural and geeky conventions, the Halo is proud to bring musical joy to any gathering. From Steampunks to Fairies, Bikers to Furries, our message always rings true - "We Love You All!"

The performers in A Halo Called Fred are:
Adam Dickinson
Bruce Meyers
Anthony Kroposky
Elizabeth Gonzalez

Find their performance at youtu.be/-O6pvrRQQnM

On behalf of the Warren County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Warren County Cultural and Heritage Division of the Department of Land Preservation thanks you for tuning in to this concert. We hope to see you next year at Shippen Manor in sweet and sunny downtown Oxford, NJ, for the resumption of live, in-person performances of the Lawn Concert Series.
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Comment on Facebook A Halo Called Fred ...

Thank you! We miss the wonderful concerts....next year for sure!

2 days ago

Shippen Manor

#DIDYOUKNOW PLEASANT VALLEY, MILL POND RD.

Pleasant Valley is located in the Highlands region of northwestern NJ in the Pohatcong Valley of southern Warren County. It is one mile west of Washington Borough, off Route 57 (Mill Pond Road) at the confluence of the Pohatcong and Shabecong Creeks.

According to the registration form for the National Register of Historic Places, “A water power site utilized by the 1770s provided the nucleus for the settlement which, clustered below a mill pond impounded by a dam/causeway, consists of several houses, a power mill (built in 1930 on the foundation of the 19th c. grist mill) and two small aircraft hangers, remnants of an auto giro airport established there in the 1930s.” (page 1)

The historic district is listed on National and State Register of Historic Places.

SHERRERD MILL (c. 1790)

John Sherrerd’s family operated the mill and farm for three generations. It supplied flour to Gen. Washington’s army while it was encamped in Morristown, NJ. Samuel Sherrerd, John’s son, married Ann Maxwell (daughter of Captain John Maxwell and niece of General William Maxwell, of the Continental Army) and brought her to Pleasant Valley. Their eldest son, John Maxwell Sherrerd, was Warren County’s first Surrogate. One of their daughters, Susan, married William Warne (he purchased the property after her father’s death in 1833).
After 1833, the name of the mill changed a few times—1833 it was Warne’s Mill, then Mattison’s Mill in 1865 and later Larison’s Mill in 1893.

In 1926, Earl S. Eckel purchased the house, mill, and other structures. He made several changes to the property—dredging and enlarging the millpond, upgrading the dam and causeway with the intent of generating hydroelectric power.

Pleasant Valley, Washington Twp (Warren Co.): www.washington-twp-warren.org/about_washington/local_history/pleasant_valley.php

Warren Co. list of historic places: www.co.warren.nj.us/Download/historic.pdf
National Register of Historic Places (registration form): npgallery.nps.gov/GetAsset/18852816-3401-480d-a246-d4c596fdc042

NJ DEP Historic Preservation Office (NJ & National Registers of Historic Places):
www.nj.gov/dep/hpo/1identify/nrsr_lists/Warren.pdf

#PleasantValley #GristMill #MillPondRoad #Sherrerd #Warne #Eckel #WashingtonTwp #WarrenCounty #NJ #ShippenManor
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3 days ago

Shippen Manor

#CONSTITUTIONDAY2020 10 Facts About the U.S. Constitution

Here are a few things you may not know about the US Constitution.

1. The first constitution of the United States was the Articles of Confederation (created on 15 Nov 1777 and ratified 1 March 1781). It was vague and had limited powers, one house (Congress) and no checks and balances.

2. Of the written national constitutions (world-wide), the U.S. Constitution is the oldest and shortest (4400 words—with amendments and signatures, the total is 7591).

3. It was written in 1787 and signed on September 17th (not the 4th of July as many people believe).

4. It was prepared in secret, behind closed doors that were guarded by sentries— The delegates were supposed to fix the Articles of Confederation (our first Constitution), but opted to rewrite it (that’s treason!). It took them only 100 days to restructure the government, but the next 200 years to test it.

5. The oldest delegate to the Constitutional Convention was Benjamin Franklin (age 83) of PA and the youngest, Jonathan Dayton (age 26) of NJ. (Franklin had to be carried to the Convention.)

6. Oh the spelling errors! For example, Pennsylvania was missing an “n”—Pensylvania and “chuse” was used in place of “choose”. [www.usconstitution.net/constmiss.html#:~:text=The%20most%20common%20mistake%2C%20at,chuse%22%20an...]

7. Only one Constitutional Amendment has been repealed by the adding of another amendment—the 18th Amendment (Prohibition). [www.archives.gov/historical-docs/todays-doc/?dod-date=1205#:~:text=On%20December%205%2C%201933%2C....]

8. Two Founding Fathers and future Presidents were not at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 and did not sign the Constitution—John Adams was serving overseas as ambassador to Great Britain and Thomas Jefferson was serving overseas as ambassador to France.

9. Originally, the first draft of the Bill of Rights had 19 Amendments, but later downsized to the ten we have today.

10. After the delegates signed the Constitution, James Madison (“Father of the Constitution”) and Alexander Hamilton went about trying to persuade the public to ratify the document through a series of essays called “The Federalist Papers”. The Federalist articles were published in select newspapers to see how the public would respond to certain aspects of the new Constitution. All of the authors went by the pseudonym “Publius”.
[Full text of The Federalist Papers: guides.loc.gov/federalist-papers/full-text]

#ConstitutionalDay2020 #USConstitutionFacts #USHistory #ShippenManor
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Comment on Facebook 816966805340316_1189741888062804

This is a great post about the Constitution.

Today is the first day of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution annual Constitution Week. Constitution Week was begun by NSDAR in 1955 with three goals: (1) emphasize citizens’ responsibilities for protecting and defending the Constitution, preserving it for posterity; (2) inform the people that the Constitution is the basis for America’s great heritage and the foundation for our way of life; and (3) encourage the study of the historical events which led to the framing of the Constitution in September 1787. The General William Maxwell Chapter, NSDAR, celebrates Constitution Week each year with proclamations from local government and reaching out to local schools with information. A tradition is to ring a bell at 4 pm on this day to celebrate!

4 days ago

Shippen Manor

This morning at Shippen, the sky was dense with fog. Reports are that we are experiencing the haze due to the wildfires out west. Positive thoughts for the first responders and residents who are affected by these fires. ... See MoreSee Less

This morning at Shippen, the sky was dense with fog. Reports are that we are experiencing the haze due to the wildfires out west. Positive thoughts for the first responders and residents who are affected by these fires.

6 days ago

Shippen Manor

This weekend, we visited #furnacelake in Oxford, ate some lunch and looked at the view.

Oxford Furnace Lake
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This weekend, we visited #FurnaceLake in Oxford, ate some lunch and looked at the view.

Oxford Furnace LakeImage attachment

1 week ago

Shippen Manor

In remembrance of the lives lost on September 11, 2001.
#neverforget #September11th
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In remembrance of the lives lost on September 11, 2001.
#NeverForget #September11th

1 week ago

Shippen Manor

#HIDDENHISTORY ROXBURG GRIST MILL (Harmony, NJ)

Hidden just off of CR 519 in Harmony Twp.(Grist Mill Road before Roxburg Hill Road) is the Roxburg Grist Mill in a tree line, this mill dates back to before the American Revolution. Captain Joseph Mackey (who I’ve mentioned in previous posts) built the original mill and it was in the Mackey family for a while.

• Captain Joseph Mackey (12 April 1741 in Sussex/Warren Co., NJ to 19 Oct 1798 in Hazen, Warren Co., NJ, buried at First Presbyterian Church of Oxford Churchyard in Hazen, Warren Co., NJ). He was married to Margaret Wilhelm Mackey (1742 to 19 May 1787, buried in First Presbyterian Church of Oxford Churchyard in Hazen, Warren Co., NJ).

In August 1837, Christian Cressman bought the mill, which was old and dilapidated. He rebuilt the mill (which is the current structure) and ran it for 25 years (“Cressman’s Mill”).

• Christian Cressman (28 Oct 1814 in Mt. Bethel, Northampton Co., PA to 19 March 1896 in Oxford, Warren Co., NJ, buried in Summerfield Methodist Cemetery in Oxford, Warren Co., NJ). He was married to Sarah Fry Cressman (15 July 1817 in PA to 18 Aug 1887 in Montville, Morris Co., NJ, buried in Summerfield Methodist Cemetery, Oxford, Warren Co., NJ).

Later, in the 19th c., Robert Bowlby owned the mill, and was successful. When he retired, he turned the mill over to his son, William, who operated the mill until 1919. After the Bowlbys ran the mill, Elmer Leo Lommason (16 Dec 1889 to 26 June 1969) bought the property. Lommason modernized the mill, removing the old-fashioned 40-foot millwheel and installed a turbine and an auxiliary steam engine. None of this proved profitable for Lommason, and by the late 1920s, he ceased his milling operation. During the Prohibition era, Lommason produced illegal whiskey at the mill, which was a profitable venture until it was raided by government agents, who shut it down and penalized him.

• Robert M. Bowlby (1840 to 1910, buried in Belvidere Cemetery). He was married to Anna J. Mitchell Bowlby (1840 to 1902, buried in Belvidere Cemetery).

• Elmer Leo Lommason (16 Dec 1889 to 26 June 1969, buried in Belvidere Cemetery). He was married to Grace E. Dalrymple Lommason (11 May 1891 in Warren Co. to 10 Oct 1962 in NY, buried in Belvidere Cemetery).

The property passed through a variety of owners after that, some of whom were not millers and spent a great deal of time and money restoring the buildings.

Today, the property is privately owned.

www.njskylands.com/tnmills
millpictures.com/mills.php?millid=1067
history.rays-place.com/nj/war-harmony.htm

#RoxburgMill #CaptainJosephMackey #GristMill #HarmonyTwp #WarrenCounty #NJ #ShippenManor
... See MoreSee Less

#HIDDENHISTORY ROXBURG GRIST MILL (Harmony, NJ)

Hidden just off of CR 519 in Harmony Twp.(Grist Mill Road before Roxburg Hill Road) is the Roxburg Grist Mill in a tree line, this mill dates back to before the American Revolution. Captain Joseph Mackey (who I’ve mentioned in previous posts) built the original mill and it was in the Mackey family for a while. 

• Captain Joseph Mackey (12 April 1741 in Sussex/Warren Co., NJ to 19 Oct 1798 in Hazen, Warren Co., NJ, buried at First Presbyterian Church of Oxford Churchyard in Hazen, Warren Co., NJ). He was married to Margaret Wilhelm Mackey (1742 to 19 May 1787, buried in First Presbyterian Church of Oxford Churchyard in Hazen, Warren Co., NJ).

In August 1837, Christian Cressman bought the mill, which was old and dilapidated.  He rebuilt the mill (which is the current structure) and ran it for 25 years (“Cressman’s Mill”). 

     • Christian Cressman (28 Oct 1814 in Mt. Bethel, Northampton Co., PA to 19 March 1896 in Oxford, Warren Co., NJ, buried in Summerfield Methodist Cemetery in Oxford, Warren Co., NJ). He was married to Sarah Fry Cressman (15 July 1817 in PA to 18 Aug 1887 in Montville, Morris Co., NJ, buried in Summerfield Methodist Cemetery, Oxford, Warren Co., NJ).

Later, in the 19th c., Robert Bowlby owned the mill, and was successful. When he retired, he turned the mill over to his son, William, who operated the mill until 1919. After the Bowlbys ran the mill, Elmer Leo Lommason (16 Dec 1889 to 26 June 1969) bought the property. Lommason modernized the mill, removing the old-fashioned 40-foot millwheel and installed a turbine and an auxiliary steam engine. None of this proved profitable for Lommason, and by the late 1920s, he ceased his milling operation. During the Prohibition era, Lommason produced illegal whiskey at the mill, which was a profitable venture until it was raided by government agents, who shut it down and penalized him.

     • Robert M. Bowlby (1840 to 1910, buried in Belvidere Cemetery). He was married to Anna J. Mitchell Bowlby (1840 to 1902, buried in Belvidere Cemetery).

     • Elmer Leo Lommason (16 Dec 1889 to 26 June 1969, buried in Belvidere Cemetery). He was married to Grace E. Dalrymple Lommason (11 May 1891 in Warren Co. to 10 Oct 1962 in NY, buried in Belvidere Cemetery).

The property passed through a variety of owners after that, some of whom were not millers and spent a great deal of time and money restoring the buildings.

Today, the property is privately owned.

http://www.njskylands.com/tnmills 
https://millpictures.com/mills.php?millid=1067
http://history.rays-place.com/nj/war-harmony.htm 

#RoxburgMill #CaptainJosephMackey #GristMill #HarmonyTwp #WarrenCounty #NJ #ShippenManorImage attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook 816966805340316_1186502198386773

Harmony, New Jersey

Always interesting!!

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