Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

12 hours ago

Shippen Manor

#LocalHistory Oxford Furnace Tract For Sale

No, it is not for sale now, but in April 1850, the Oxford Furnace and Mines, farms and woodlands were for sale. The property was located in parts of Oxford, Hope, Washington and Mansfield and included 5,885 acres of land with five farms, 856 acres, 350 acres of chestnut trees that were worth a lot for the time. The “large stone mansion” (Shippen Manor), the stone mill (currently Oxford Colonial United Methodist Church), a stone store (which no longer exists), dwellings for workers (some still exist), sufficient stables (few if any exist), and about 70-80 acres of meadowland adjacent to the furnace.

The price? A “low sum of $100,000”. Today, that would be a bargain!
#ShippenManor #OxfordFurnace #OxfordNJ #WarrenCoNJ #fromthearchives
... See MoreSee Less

#LocalHistory Oxford Furnace Tract For Sale 

No, it is not for sale now, but in April 1850, the Oxford Furnace and Mines, farms and woodlands were for sale. The property was located in parts of Oxford, Hope, Washington and Mansfield and included 5,885 acres of land with five farms, 856 acres, 350 acres of chestnut trees that were worth a lot for the time. The “large stone mansion” (Shippen Manor), the stone mill (currently Oxford Colonial United Methodist Church), a stone store (which no longer exists), dwellings for workers (some still exist), sufficient stables (few if any exist), and about 70-80 acres of meadowland adjacent to the furnace.

The price? A “low sum of $100,000”.  Today, that would be a bargain!
#ShippenManor #OxfordFurnace #OxfordNJ #WarrenCoNJ #fromthearchives

3 days ago

Shippen Manor

Timeline PhotosJoin Joel Farkas to learn about some of our "First Ladies" who made a difference. Register and learn more by clicking this link.
libraryaware.com/2919X9
... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Shippen Manor

#TODAYINHISTORY Boston Massacre (3/5/1770)

On this date in 1770, British sentries were guarding the Boston Customs House and shot into the crowd of civilians, killing three men and injuring eight (two mortally). Bostonians who were shouting insults and throwing hard-packed snowballs at the soldiers, angry about restrictive British rules implemented on Boston. When a snowball hit one of the British soldiers, they fired into the crowd despite explicit orders to not fire.

The Boston Massacre was a result of growing tensions between Great Britain and the American colonies. Following the French and Indian War, the British, burdened by debt, attempted to exercise greater control over its American colonies while increasing revenues (taxes). In 1764, a series of acts and proclamations limited westward expansion and more British political control over the colonies, and an increase in taxes. The Stamp Act, which was particularly egregious, levied an increased tax (duty) on all paper documents (newspapers, wills, playing cards, dice, etc.).

Because of the Boston Massacre, Boston and the colonies grew angry and frustrated. Sam Adams, 2nd cousin of future president John Adams, signer of the Declaration of Independence and a leader of the Sons of Liberty (pro-liberty radical group of colonists), played a lead role in depicting March 5th as a battle for American liberty and transformed the dead rioters into martyrs for liberty. He wanted all British troops removed from Boston. Conversely, his cousin John Adams defended the soldiers at the trial. It was determined that the soldiers would not receive a “fair” trial in the colonies and the soldiers were sent back to Britain, which further angered the colonists.

The first civilian to fall was Crispus Attucks, an African-American sailor who escaped slavery in 1750 and worked on whaling ships for the next twenty years. It the 19th c., Crispus Attucks became an important symbol of patriotism and military valor for the African-American people. “When in 1776 the Negro was asked to decide between British oppression and American independence”, Booker T. Washington observed in his 1898 address, “we find him choosing the better part and Crispus Attucks, a Negro, was the first to shed his blood on State Street, Boston, that the white American might enjoy liberty forever, though his race remained in slavery.” Referring to his status as an escaped slave, Attucks risked personal liberty and his life by participation in the rebellion that led to the massacre.

The victims of the event: (three died on the spot, two died shortly after—one died the next morning and the other two weeks later) [www.bostonmassacre.net/players/index.htm]

1. Crispus Attucks: mulatto sailor (African American and Native American descent) died on the spot.
2. Samuel Gray: a rope-maker who also died on the spot was one of the hardiest brawlers in Boston.
3. James Caldwell: a mate from the brig “Hawk” was 17 years old when he was shot.
4. Samuel Maverick: A 17 year old who was mortally wounded and died the next morning.
5. Patrick Carr: a leather worker who was an Irish immigrant who died two weeks later.
6. Christopher Monk: a 17-year old who died 10 years later on 20 April 1780; it is believed that he should be considered the 6th victim because his injury resulted in a disability and it later death. The bullet entered just above his groin and came out his hip on the other side. Bostonians believed he would die of his injuries, and Paul Revere listed him as “mortally wounded” on his engraving.

British soldiers: [www.bostonmassacre.net/players/index.htm]

1. Captain Thomas Preston of the 14th Regiment, the Officer of the Day who commanded the British soldiers stationed outside of the Customs House.

2. Private Hugh White was the soldier on duty outside of the Customs House on 5 March 1770 when the incident occurred.

3. Captain John Goldfinch was on duty that night when a young wigmaker’s apprentice named Edward Garrick accused him of not having paid his master’s bill.

4. Corporal William Wemms was an experienced officers who led the soldiers of the 29th Reg’t to help Hugh White who was surrounded by the crowd.

5. Lt. James Basset was the 2nd officer of the main guard under the command of Captain Thomas Preston.

6. Private Hugh Montgomery was the first British soldier to fire into the crows. He was also identified by many witnesses in his trial as the man who shot and killed Crispus Attucks.

Samuel Gray, Samuel Maverick, James Caldwell, Crispus Attucks and Patrick Carr are buried in the Granary Burying Ground located at 83-115 Tremont Street, Boston, MA. Christopher Snider, a teenager, is also identified on this grave marker as he was killed a couple of weeks before the massacre after Loyalist Ebenezer Richardson shot him and wounded several others who were a part of an angry crowd that were targeting Richardson in response to the new British taxes. Richardson was eventually tried for the murder of Snider, found guilty but pardoned by the Royal Governor after serving two years in prison.

#BostonMassacre #Causes #USHistory #AmericanRevolution #SonsofLiberty #GranaryBuryingGround #Loyalists #Patriots #ShippenManor
... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Shippen Manor

#LOCALHISTORY BOWERSTOWN

Jesse Vanetta and Michael Bowers established the village of Bowerstown, located in Washington Twp., when the foundry was built in 1829. It is located in the Highlands region of northwestern New Jersey, in the Pohatcong Valley, about a mile north of Washington Borough. The Foundry is located near the Morris Canal and Plane 7 West (Plane Hill Road). The foundry was a small, water-powered, 19th c. industrial building.
[npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NRHP/96000537_text]

The village, originally called “Fairmount”, developed in the middle 19th c. due to the construction of the Morris Canal (1824-1931). The canal’s inclined plane 9 west and its adjoining boat basin was the center of activity during the canal years.

Aaron Van Eita (Vanetta, Vannatta) owned land where the Canal crossed Pohatcong Creek, a house and two outbuildings. They were the only structures in the immediate vicinity. His son, Jesse, opened a foundry in 1829 just east of his father’s homestead and partnered with Michael B. Bowers. The foundry site along the Pohatcong Creek was a source of water power and was not only close to the canal basin, but also two miles away from the Oxford Furnace and iron ore mining. By 1832, the Oxford Furnace was reactivated by new owner William Henry, who introduced hot-blast to the Furnace, which increased output.

The foundry property changed hands twice before it was purchased by Michael Bowers in 1843. In the 1850 Products of Industry census reports, it was reported that this foundry produced twenty tons of casting that were valued at $1500. It utilized 25 tons of iron and 15 tons of coal with one hand (employee). It also indicated that Bowers engaged in blacksmith work and repair of wagons and field machines (work valued at $550) in which he hired an addition worker and used 3,000 pounds of iron and steel and 6 tons of coal.

The operations for the foundry and Peter Van Doren’s grist mill (no longer standing) expanded in the 1850s and 1860s, where the work expanded to include a molder, two blacksmiths and a wheelwright in addition to proprietor and his son, Sering P. Bowers. At that time, a cupola furnace was added to the physical plant. Output valued at $3200 and included 150 plows worth $1200. In 1869, Michael Bowers retired and left his son, Sering to manage the business. The following year, they employed six employees who produced 100 plows worth $1350, castings valued at $7000, and a variety of other things such as wagons, sled, and equipment that was valued at almost $700.

In April 1858, a one-room schoolhouse was built in the village (School District #7), which shows the growth of the community due to the Canal and Morris & Essex Railroad, which passed nearby.
The 1870s demonstrated the slow decline of business in Bowerstown and by the early 20th c., the canal, foundry and Van Doren Grist Mill were out of operation.

Today, the Warren Hills Regional School District Administration uses the complex (including the buildings built by Consumers’ Research, which acquired the property in the 1930s).

#BowerstownNJ #WashingtonTwp #BowersForge #MorrisCanal #VanDoren #Bowers #PohatcongCreek #PohatcongValley #MorrisandEssexRR #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor #OxfordFurnace
... See MoreSee Less

#LOCALHISTORY BOWERSTOWN

Jesse Vanetta and Michael Bowers established the village of Bowerstown, located in Washington Twp., when the foundry was built in 1829. It is located in the Highlands region of northwestern New Jersey, in the Pohatcong Valley, about a mile north of Washington Borough. The Foundry is located near the Morris Canal and Plane 7 West (Plane Hill Road). The foundry was a small, water-powered, 19th c. industrial building. 
[https://npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NRHP/96000537_text]

The village, originally called “Fairmount”, developed in the middle 19th c. due to the construction of the Morris Canal (1824-1931). The canal’s inclined plane 9 west and its adjoining boat basin was the center of activity during the canal years.

Aaron Van Eita (Vanetta, Vannatta) owned land where the Canal crossed Pohatcong Creek, a house and two outbuildings. They were the only structures in the immediate vicinity. His son, Jesse, opened a foundry in 1829 just east of his father’s homestead and partnered with Michael B. Bowers. The foundry site along the Pohatcong Creek was a source of water power and was not only close to the canal basin, but also two miles away from the Oxford Furnace and iron ore mining.  By 1832, the Oxford Furnace was reactivated by new owner William Henry, who introduced hot-blast to the Furnace, which increased output.

The foundry property changed hands twice before it was purchased by Michael Bowers in 1843. In the 1850 Products of Industry census reports, it was reported that this foundry produced twenty tons of casting that were valued at $1500. It utilized 25 tons of iron and 15 tons of coal with one hand (employee). It also indicated that Bowers engaged in blacksmith work and repair of wagons and field machines (work valued at $550) in which he hired an addition worker and used 3,000 pounds of iron and steel and 6 tons of coal.

The operations for the foundry and Peter Van Doren’s grist mill (no longer standing) expanded in the 1850s and 1860s, where the work expanded to include a molder, two blacksmiths and a wheelwright in addition to proprietor and his son, Sering P. Bowers. At that time, a cupola furnace was added to the physical plant. Output valued at $3200 and included 150 plows worth $1200. In 1869, Michael Bowers retired and left his son, Sering to manage the business. The following year, they employed six employees who produced 100 plows worth $1350, castings valued at $7000, and a variety of other things such as wagons, sled, and equipment that was valued at almost $700. 

In April 1858, a one-room schoolhouse was built in the village (School District #7), which shows the growth of the community due to the Canal and Morris & Essex Railroad, which passed nearby.
The 1870s demonstrated the slow decline of business in Bowerstown and by the early 20th c., the canal, foundry and Van Doren Grist Mill were out of operation.

Today, the Warren Hills Regional School District Administration uses the complex (including the buildings built by Consumers’ Research, which acquired the property in the 1930s).

#BowerstownNJ #WashingtonTwp #BowersForge #MorrisCanal #VanDoren #Bowers #PohatcongCreek #PohatcongValley #MorrisandEssexRR #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor #OxfordFurnaceImage attachmentImage attachment

7 days ago

Shippen Manor

A head's up for those going through Washington today. This building had a partial collapse and traffic may be affected in town. ... See MoreSee Less

A heads up for those going through Washington today. This building had a partial collapse and traffic may be affected in town.

Comment on Facebook A head's up for ...

The road is now open to vehicles.

What street is this located

Was the building being renovated?

7 days ago

Shippen Manor

#WCOldHomes Ramsey House, Port Murray, NJ

Someone had asked about this house* a little bit ago.
We are still researching the house, but in the meantime, here are some old maps and a modern image of the structure. We do not have the history of old homes here (we've been asked about that before) other than what is in the townships' celebratory commemorative books. The family information was mentioned in the "Axfords of Oxford" book and George Wyckoff Cummins, "History of Warren County" from 1911.

There is a familial connection between the Ramsey family and the Axfords (Oxford, NJ). How exciting! A new family member!

*The house and its property are privately owned.

#RamseyFamily #AxfordFamily #PortMurrayNJ #MainStreet #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor #Oxford
... See MoreSee Less

#WCOldHomes Ramsey House, Port Murray, NJ

Someone had asked about this house* a little bit ago.
We are still researching the house, but in the meantime, here are some old maps and a modern image of the structure. We do not have the history of old homes here (weve been asked about that before) other than what is in the townships celebratory commemorative books. The family information was mentioned in the Axfords of Oxford book and George Wyckoff Cummins, History of Warren County from 1911.

There is a familial connection between the Ramsey family and the Axfords (Oxford, NJ). How exciting! A new family member!

*The house and its property are privately owned.

#RamseyFamily #AxfordFamily #PortMurrayNJ #MainStreet #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor #Oxford

1 week ago

Shippen Manor

#TODAYINHISTORY KIDNAPPING OF THE LINDBERGH BABY

THE CRIME

Eighty-nine years ago, Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., the 20-month old son of famed aviator, Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, was kidnapped from his family’s new mansion in Hopewell (Hunterdon Co.), NJ.

Charles, Sr. became an international celebrity after he flew the first solo flight across the Atlantic in 1927. The child’s nurse, Betty Gow, discovered the child missing at around 10:00 pm on 1 March 1932. She alerted his parents and a search of the house occurred. Lindbergh, Sr. and his wife, Anne, discovered a ransom note on the nursery windowsill that demanded $50,000.

The Hopewell police contacted the NJ State Police, who took over the investigation. Investigators found muddy footprints on the floor of the nursery and a wooden ladder under the nursery window. Of the two sections of the ladder used to reach the window, one of them split or broke, indicating that the ladder was broken during use for this crime. There were neither bloodstains nor fingerprints in or around the nursery.

(Note: Col. H. Norman Schwarzkopf was the Chief of the State Police during this time. His son was General Herman Norman "Stormin' Norman" Schwarzkopf, Jr., who led American forces during the US invasion of Kuwait in 1990.)

There were a multiple offers of assistance (and many false clues). Even Al Capone offered his help from prison. Investigators spent three days searching but found nothing. There was also no further word from the kidnappers. A new letter showed up and demanded $70,000 along with instructions for dropping off the money. They were told the baby was on a boat called “Nelly”, which was anchored off the coast of Massachusetts. Following an exhaustive search, there was neither sign of the boat nor the child.

Soon after, Charles, Jr.’s remains were found less than a mile from the Lindbergh mansion. The child was murdered the night of the kidnapping from blunt force trauma to his head. His body was burned after his death. A party of tree movers discovered his remains at 3:15 pm near Mount Rose, a community of five houses and a general store. The crime scene was atop a hill located 75’ from the road. The authorities were able to identify his body because of his clothing, tight-fitting flannel band and embroidered collar as well as curly blond hair.

The heartbroken Lindberghs donated their mansion to charity and moved away.

BRUNO HAUPTMANN

Meanwhile, the search for his murders continued until September 1934 when a marked bill from the ransom money showed up at a gas station. The gas station attendant accepted the bill and wrote down the license plate number because he was suspicious of the driver. The vehicle was connected to German immigrant and carpenter, Bruno Hauptmann. When detectives searched his home, they found a part of the ransom money. Hauptmann claimed that a friend gave him the money to hold onto and that he was not connected to the crime.

THE TRIAL

The trial was a national sensation! The prosecution’s case was not especially strong. In addition to Hauptmann’s possession of some of the ransom money, the main evidence was testimony from handwriting experts who determined that he wrote the letters. The prosecution tried to establish a link between Hauptmann and the wood used to make the ladder.

HAUPTMANN IS FOUND GUILTY

According to the FBI website, “On February 13, 1935, the jury returned a verdict. Hauptmann was guilty of murder in the first degree. The sentence: death. The defense appealed.

The Supreme Court of the State of New Jersey on October 9, 1935, upheld the verdict of the Lower Court. Hauptmann’s appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States was denied on December 9, 1935, and he was to be electrocuted on January 17, 1936. However, on this same day the Governor of the State of New Jersey granted a 30-day reprieve and on February 17, 1936, Hauptmann was re-sentenced, to be electrocuted during the week of March 30, 1936. On March 30, 1936, the Pardon Court of the State of New Jersey denied Hauptmann’s petition for clemency, and on April 3, 1936, at 8:47 p.m., Bruno Richard Hauptmann was electrocuted.”

There are still people today that believe that Hauptmann was innocent. Nothing has ever been proven to substantiate this.

#LindberghKidnapping #Hopewell #HunterdonCo #NJHistory #CharlesLindbergh #AnneMorrowLindbergh #Schwarzkopf #Haupmann #ShippenManor

RESOURCES:

Bencks, Jarret. “Covering the crime of the century: The Lindbergh kidnapping and a media revolution.” Brandeis University Newspaper, Brandeis Now. 18 December 2020. www.brandeis.edu/now/2020/december/lindbergh-doherty-qa.html.

“Charles Lindbergh’s baby found dead beside the Princeton-Hopewell Road in 1932.” New York Daily News. 13 May 1932. Republished 11 May 2016. www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/body-charles-lindbergh-baby-found-hopewell-1932-article-1.2632021.

“Kidnapping and Trial.” Charles Lindbergh House & Museum. www.mnhs.org/lindbergh/learn/kidnapping.

“Lindbergh Evidence.” NJ State Archives. www.nj.gov/state/archives/slcsp001.html.

“Lindbergh Kidnapping.” FBI History. www.fbi.gov/history/famous-cases/lindbergh-kidnapping
... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Shippen Manor

If you recognize this slipper...

#lostandfound #ShippenManor
... See MoreSee Less

If you recognize this slipper...

#LostandFound #ShippenManor
Load more