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11 minutes ago

Shippen Manor

#WCLIMEKILNS Washington Twp. (Warren Co.)

This double kiln, located behind the Shop Rite (Washington, Route 31 South) is probably one of the most viewed in the County. There is little known about this kiln but it is in reasonably good condition. Due to its size, it most likely serviced several local farms. This method of producing quicklime was replaced during the Second Industrial Revolution with the incorporated of chemicals, petroleum and electricity into technology. Most of the limekilns on the kiosk map located in front of these kilns are no longer standing.

Note: On the F.W. Beers Atlas (1874) for Washington Township, the double kilns are not identified (but I marked the estimated location with a green star).

The County Division of Cultural & Heritage Affairs will continue to collect information so that we can document the rest of the existing limekilns (In the 1990s, there was an estimate of 99 in the county. So far, we have verified about 30.)

If there is a kiln (regardless of condition) on your property and you would like to share that information with us, message us at Facebook or email Gina (grosseland@co.warren.nj.us).

Thank you and we hope that you enjoyed the #WCLimeKilns series.

#WCLimeKilns #WashingtonTwpKilns #ShopRite #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor
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#WCLIMEKILNS Washington Twp. (Warren Co.)

This double kiln, located behind the Shop Rite (Washington, Route 31 South) is probably one of the most viewed in the County. There is little known about this kiln but it is in reasonably good condition. Due to its size, it most likely serviced several local farms. This method of producing quicklime was replaced during the Second Industrial Revolution with the incorporated of chemicals, petroleum and electricity into technology. Most of the limekilns on the kiosk map located in front of these kilns are no longer standing.

Note: On the F.W. Beers Atlas (1874) for Washington Township, the double kilns are not identified (but I marked the estimated location with a green star).
   
The County Division of Cultural & Heritage Affairs will continue to collect information so that we can document the rest of the existing limekilns (In the 1990s, there was an estimate of 99 in the county. So far, we have verified about 30.) 

If there is a kiln (regardless of condition) on your property and you would like to share that information with us, message us at Facebook or email Gina (grosseland@co.warren.nj.us). 

Thank you and we hope that you enjoyed the #WCLimeKilns series.

#WCLimeKilns #WashingtonTwpKilns #ShopRite #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor

1 day ago

Shippen Manor

#OLDSCHOOLHOUSES Carpentersville (Pohatcong Twp., Warren Co.)

Oak Grove No. 9 schoolhouse (on the 1874 Beers Map) is located along Snyders Road just before it connects with River Road. The schoolhouse was a pleasant surprise while we were looking for the kilns.

#SchoolHouses #carpentersville #pohatcongtwp #warrenconj #1874beersatlas #ShippenManor
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#OLDSCHOOLHOUSES Carpentersville (Pohatcong Twp., Warren Co.)

Oak Grove No. 9 schoolhouse (on the 1874 Beers Map) is located along Snyders Road just before it connects with River Road. The schoolhouse was a pleasant surprise while we were looking for the kilns.

#Schoolhouses #Carpentersville #PohatcongTwp #WarrenCoNJ #1874BeersAtlas #ShippenManor

2 days ago

Shippen Manor

#WCLIMEKILNS Finesville Area

Finesville (Pohatcong Twp.) is located along the Musconetcong about a mile from the Delaware River. Finesville was named after the Fine family, particularly Philip and John, who arrived from Germany and settled here. The Chelsea Forge (the actual Forge no longer exists, but there is an antique store in the large red bard on the south side of the road that is called “Chelsea Forge”) was located in Finesville. The Chelsea Forge used pig iron purchased from the Durham Furnace that began producing pig iron around 1727 and is located south of Riegelsville, PA along the Delaware River. The pig iron would then be transported across the Delaware on ferries (you can read more about the ferries along the Delaware in NJ in Frank Dale’s Our Delaware River Ferries, June 2002 or the PA ferries on the river at: The History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Chapter XLI, Durham, 1775. By W.W. H. Davis, 1876 and 1905 editions, files.usgwarchives.net/pa/bucks/history/local/davis/davis41.txt).

#WCLIMEKILNS #FINESVILLE #POHATCONGTWP #RIEGELSVILLEWARRENGLENRD #WARRENCOUNTYNJ #SHIPPENMANOR
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#WCLIMEKILNS Finesville Area

Finesville (Pohatcong Twp.) is located along the Musconetcong about a mile from the Delaware River. Finesville was named after the Fine family, particularly Philip and John, who arrived from Germany and settled here. The Chelsea Forge (the actual Forge no longer exists, but there is an antique store in the large red bard on the south side of the road that is called “Chelsea Forge”) was located in Finesville. The Chelsea Forge used pig iron purchased from the Durham Furnace that began producing pig iron around 1727 and is located south of Riegelsville, PA along the Delaware River. The pig iron would then be transported across the Delaware on ferries (you can read more about the ferries along the Delaware in NJ in Frank Dale’s Our Delaware River Ferries, June 2002 or the PA ferries on the river at: The History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Chapter XLI, Durham, 1775. By W.W. H. Davis, 1876 and 1905 editions, http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/bucks/history/local/davis/davis41.txt). 

#WCLIMEKILNS #FINESVILLE #POHATCONGTWP #RIEGELSVILLEWARRENGLENRD #WARRENCOUNTYNJ #SHIPPENMANOR

3 days ago

Shippen Manor

#WCLIMEKILNS Carpentersville (Pohatcong Twp.)

Along River Road in Carpentersville (Pohatcong Twp.) are several commercial limekilns from the 19th c. that parallel the Bel-Del railroad. The triple kiln is marked on Google Maps and is probably the most well-known. But there are several others (all on private property) that are visible from the road. According to Richard Edwards (Industries of NJ, 1882), there were ten kilns in Carpentersville. Over the weekend, we found the triple, a single and partial third (possibly more in that location, but they are on private property and hard to see from the road). Additional kilns were found south of these and will be posted this week.

As a reminder, these kilns are mostly on private property and visible from the road. The Division of Cultural & Heritage Affairs and the County of Warren do not support or condone trespassing. Also, please stay off of the kilns—they are over 100 years old and could collapse an injure someone (we want you to safely search for history).

These were a great find and identified on the Beers 1874 Atlas (Greenwich Twp.), which means they existed before this time. Moreover, there are kilns that exist that are not identified on the 1874 maps. That does not mean they did not exist, it just means they were built after the Atlas maps were completed (est. maybe five years prior to it being published).

HISTORY OF CARPENTERSVILLE

Carpentersville, named for Jacob Carpenter who arrived here from Switzerland in 1748. The Carpenter family intermarried with the Kennedys, Stewarts and other prominent families of this and other local townships. It is a station on the Pennsylvania Railroad (1854). Also located in this area was Roper’s Ferry, which operated here as early as 1769 (Wyckoff Cummins, The History of Warren County, NJ, page 241-42).

#WCLimeKilns #CarpentersvilleNJ #PohatcongNJ #RiverRoad #AlongtheDelawareRiver #WarrenCountyNJ #ShippenManor
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#WCLIMEKILNS Carpentersville (Pohatcong Twp.)

Along River Road in Carpentersville (Pohatcong Twp.) are several commercial limekilns from the 19th c. that parallel the Bel-Del railroad. The triple kiln is marked on Google Maps and is probably the most well-known. But there are several others (all on private property) that are visible from the road. According to Richard Edwards (Industries of NJ, 1882), there were ten kilns in Carpentersville.  Over the weekend, we found the triple, a single and partial third (possibly more in that location, but they are on private property and hard to see from the road). Additional kilns were found south of these and will be posted this week.

As a reminder, these kilns are mostly on private property and visible from the road. The Division of Cultural & Heritage Affairs and the County of Warren do not support or condone trespassing. Also, please stay off of the kilns—they are over 100 years old and could collapse an injure someone (we want you to safely search for history).

These were a great find and identified on the Beers 1874 Atlas (Greenwich Twp.), which means they existed before this time. Moreover, there are kilns that exist that are not identified on the 1874 maps. That does not mean they did not exist, it just means they were built after the Atlas maps were completed (est. maybe five years prior to it being published).

HISTORY OF CARPENTERSVILLE

Carpentersville, named for Jacob Carpenter who arrived here from Switzerland in 1748. The Carpenter family intermarried with the Kennedys, Stewarts and other prominent families of this and other local townships. It is a station on the Pennsylvania Railroad (1854).  Also located in this area was Roper’s Ferry, which operated here as early as 1769 (Wyckoff Cummins, The History of Warren County, NJ, page 241-42).

#WCLimeKilns #CarpentersvilleNJ #PohatcongNJ #RiverRoad #AlongtheDelawareRiver #WarrenCountyNJ #ShippenManor

Comment on Facebook #WCLIMEKILNS ...

Lime Kilns in NW NJ are everywhere, really, even in places where they cannot be viewed from public land. Is there not one publicly viewable just south of the Shop-Rite on US-31 South of Washington?

6 days ago

Shippen Manor

#WCLIMEKILNS Valley Road (Mansfield Twp.)
POSTED: 10/23/2020
This kiln was photographed from Valley Road while traveling north from Jackson Valley Road. It is located at the entrance of a driveway/private road, so we consider that it is on private property. It was photographed from the road. (Remember—always be safe when you are visiting historic sites such as limekilns are sometimes found alongside the road where there may be no shoulder or safe place to pull over.)
A kiln of this size could provide quicklime to a handful of farms (or more).
Also included is a diagram of a typical limekiln. Through researching the types of kilns, the design does not matter. Some are triangular and others with rounded arches.

#valleyroad #locallimekilns #mansfieldtwp #warrenconj #ShippenManor
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#WCLIMEKILNS Valley Road (Mansfield Twp.)
POSTED: 10/23/2020
This kiln was photographed from Valley Road while traveling north from Jackson Valley Road. It is located at the entrance of a driveway/private road, so we consider that it is on private property. It was photographed from the road. (Remember—always be safe when you are visiting historic sites such as limekilns are sometimes found alongside the road where there may be no shoulder or safe place to pull over.)
A kiln of this size could provide quicklime to a handful of farms (or more).
Also included is a diagram of a typical limekiln. Through researching the types of kilns, the design does not matter. Some are triangular and others with rounded arches. 

#ValleyRoad #LocalLimeKilns #MansfieldTwp #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManorImage attachment

Comment on Facebook 816966805340316_1223481061355553

There is safe site to visit behind ShopRite Washington it has parking and descriptive sign

I seem to recall one on the right side of Rt 57 ( going west) in Mansfield. Not sure if it is still there.

7 days ago

Shippen Manor

SHIPPEN MANOR VIRTUAL LAWN CONCERT #3: The VooDUDES
Find their performance at youtu.be/2r1uZy9NG5w

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions placed on large gatherings to stop the spread of the virus, the annual Shippen Manor Lawn Concerts Series could not be held in 2020. However, the Warren County Cultural and Heritage Division of the Department of Land Preservation, a partner of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, invites you to enjoy online concerts by the bands that were scheduled to perform. Next on stage is The VooDUDES!

Mixing the rhythms of Mardi Gras and the Gulf Coast with Rhythm & Blues and Country, The VooDUDES have made a ruckus down through 30 years of recording and touring internationally. The New Orleans TIMES-PICAYUNE wrote that hearing The VooDUDES was like finding long-lost cousins. Most of their listeners would agree that the band is nothing if not "big fun!"

Playing in this video performance are: Dave Ambrosy (drums/vocals); Gary Ambrosy (guitar/vocals); Andy Bernstein (vocals/percussion/harmonica); Danny Caruso (bass) and John Pittas (keyboards/accordion). Find The VooDUDES online at: www.thevoodudes.com or
www.facebook.com/thevoodudesnj.
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SHIPPEN MANOR VIRTUAL LAWN CONCERT #3: The VooDUDES
Find their performance at https://youtu.be/2r1uZy9NG5w 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions placed on large gatherings to stop the spread of the virus, the annual Shippen Manor Lawn Concerts Series could not be held in 2020. However, the Warren County Cultural and Heritage Division of the Department of Land Preservation, a partner of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, invites you to enjoy online concerts by the bands that were scheduled to perform. Next on stage is The VooDUDES!

Mixing the rhythms of Mardi Gras and the Gulf Coast with Rhythm & Blues and Country, The VooDUDES have made a ruckus down through 30 years of recording and touring internationally. The New Orleans TIMES-PICAYUNE wrote that hearing The VooDUDES was like finding long-lost cousins. Most of their listeners would agree that the band is nothing if not big fun!

Playing in this video performance are: Dave Ambrosy (drums/vocals); Gary Ambrosy (guitar/vocals); Andy Bernstein (vocals/percussion/harmonica); Danny Caruso (bass) and John Pittas (keyboards/accordion). Find The VooDUDES online at: http://www.thevoodudes.com or 
http://www.facebook.com/thevoodudesnj.

1 week ago

Shippen Manor

#Webinar: The Basics of Artifact Preservation has been postponed until Thurs., 10/29 (1-3pm) due to technical difficulties today.
We are opening this to all members (volunteer or paid) of any historical group, society, commission, committee, site, etc. (public or private) in Warren County. If you are able to attend this webinar (yes, you will need access to a webcam), please call the office to reserve your space-- 908-453-4381.
Also, feel free to share this with your group members.
Again, sincerest apologies to today's participants. We hope that you can join us again next week.
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#Webinar: The Basics of Artifact Preservation has been postponed until Thurs., 10/29 (1-3pm) due to technical difficulties today.
We are opening this to all members (volunteer or paid) of any historical group, society, commission, committee, site, etc. (public or private) in Warren County. If you are able to attend this webinar (yes, you will need access to a webcam), please call the office to reserve your space-- 908-453-4381. 
Also, feel free to share this with your group members.
Again, sincerest apologies to todays participants. We hope that you can join us again next week.

Comment on Facebook #Webinar: The Basics...

Today is the last day to sign up for the webinar on Thurs.

1 week ago

Shippen Manor

#WCLIMEKILNS Carpentersville (Pohatong Twp.)

According to the article, “Both Sides Now” by Bob Koppenhaver (Summer 2009), “Just beyond the third grade crossing [Bel-Del rail line], two imposing, expertly-rafted stone structures are surviving examples of nearly two dozen commercial kilns that produced many thousands of bushels of lime from locally quarried limestone.” Coal was carried on the adjacent railroad tracks [Bel-Del] to fuel the limekilns and diminish the stone to quicklime. Then, the final product was shipped via railroad to Flemington, Trenton and Mercer County. As was stated in the introductory post about limekilns, quicklime was used to create mortar, cement, and agricultural fertilizer. (njskylands.com/tn_riverroad_092)

There are other kilns along this road, but we’d have to visit and photograph them (if they are on public access or could be photographed safely from the road). We will also let you know if the kilns are accessible (public land) or on private property. If they are on private property (which is most likely the case), we want to remind everyone that trespassing is not endorsed by this office or the County of Warren. Also, please remember to stay off of the kilns as they can collapse and you can be injured.

#WCLimeKilns #LocalHistory #PohatongTwp #Carpentersville #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor
... See MoreSee Less

#WCLIMEKILNS Carpentersville (Pohatong Twp.)

According to the article, “Both Sides Now” by Bob Koppenhaver (Summer 2009), “Just beyond the third grade crossing [Bel-Del rail line], two imposing, expertly-rafted stone structures are surviving examples of nearly two dozen commercial kilns that produced many thousands of bushels of lime from locally quarried limestone.” Coal was carried on the adjacent railroad tracks [Bel-Del] to fuel the limekilns and diminish the stone to quicklime. Then, the final product was shipped via railroad to Flemington, Trenton and Mercer County. As was stated in the introductory post about limekilns, quicklime was used to create mortar, cement, and agricultural fertilizer. (https://njskylands.com/tn_riverroad_092)

There are other kilns along this road, but we’d have to visit and photograph them (if they are on public access or could be photographed safely from the road). We will also let you know if the kilns are accessible (public land) or on private property. If they are on private property (which is most likely the case), we want to remind everyone that trespassing is not endorsed by this office or the County of Warren. Also, please remember to stay off of the kilns as they can collapse and you can be injured.  

#WCLimeKilns #LocalHistory #PohatongTwp #Carpentersville #WarrenCoNJ #ShippenManor
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